Posts tagged with Kdot

Start of construction on K-10 east of Lawrence postponed for one week

Drivers on Kansas Highway 10 east of Lawrence expecting to encounter construction delays Monday got a one-week reprieve.

The Kansas Department of Transportation announced the resurfacing project in Douglas County was moved from Monday to next Monday, Sept. 19, due to scheduling conflicts.

KDOT officials have contracted with Hamm Co., Perry, for a $4.3 million project to expand shoulders on K-10 east of Lawrence in Douglas County and install rumble strips to alert drivers who veer onto the shoulder. The project, which is scheduled to be complete Nov. 4 weather permitting, also includes milling and repaving the driving lanes.

KDOT says crews will not work during peak travel times — morning and evening rush hours and Kansas University game days — but KDOT says drivers should be aware of possible delays on the busy highway and adjacent interchange ramps.

The Johnson County portion of K-10 east of Lawrence already has rumble strips in the shoulders, but the Douglas County portion does not.

By George Diepenbrock

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KDOT warns drivers: Be ready for delays on K-10 during roadwork, starting on Monday

The Kansas Department of Transportation is warning drivers on Kansas Highway 10 about possible delays east of Lawrence beginning Monday, when work is scheduled to start on a repaving and rumble strip project.

In August, KDOT officials awarded a $4.3 million bid to Hamm Co. of Perry to expand shoulders on K-10 east of Lawrence in Douglas County and install rumble strips to alert drivers who veer onto the shoulder. The project, scheduled to begin Monday and end Nov. 4, also includes milling and repaving the driving lanes.

Kim Qualls, a KDOT spokeswoman, said crews will not work during peak travel times — morning and evening rush hours and Kansas University game days — but she said it’s such a busy highway that drivers should be aware of possible delays.

The Johnson County portion of K-10 east of Lawrence already has rumble strips in the shoulders, but the Douglas County portion does not.

In April, after a fatality crash near the Church Street exit in Eudora killed two people, including 5-year-old Cainan Shutt, Gov. Sam Brownback ordered the KDOT to have the rumble strip project completed this fall, and Brownback also required KDOT to work with local residents and government officials to study whether to install cable-median barriers on K-10. The study group has been meeting once a month since May.

By George Diepenbrock

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KDOT warns drivers: Be ready for delays on K-10 during roadwork, starting on Monday

The Kansas Department of Transportation is warning drivers on Kansas Highway 10 about possible delays east of Lawrence beginning Monday, when work is scheduled to start on a repaving and rumble strip project.

In August, KDOT officials awarded a $4.3 million bid to Hamm Co. of Perry to expand shoulders on K-10 east of Lawrence in Douglas County and install rumble strips to alert drivers who veer onto the shoulder. The project, scheduled to begin Monday and end Nov. 4, also includes milling and repaving the driving lanes.

Kim Qualls, a KDOT spokeswoman, said crews will not work during peak travel times — morning and evening rush hours and Kansas University game days — but she said it’s such a busy highway that drivers should be aware of possible delays.

The Johnson County portion of K-10 east of Lawrence already has rumble strips in the shoulders, but the Douglas County portion does not.

In April, after a fatality crash near the Church Street exit in Eudora killed two people, including 5-year-old Cainan Shutt, Gov. Sam Brownback ordered the KDOT to have the rumble strip project completed this fall, and Brownback also required KDOT to work with local residents and government officials to study whether to install cable-median barriers on K-10. The study group has been meeting once a month since May.

By George Diepenbrock

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Committee wants Kansas Highway 10 to be a safety corridor

Members of a Kansas Highway 10 safety committee had a long list of concerns last week when they proposed a plan to increase fines and enforcement on the commuter highway east of Lawrence.

They wanted a crackdown on speeding after Kansas Department of Transportation officials showed them statistics that 15 percent of drivers were traveling faster than 77 mph within the 70 mph speed limit. Also, they worried about the number of drivers sending text messages as they barrel down the four-lane highway frequently taking their eyes off the road to look at their phones.

As the first recommendation from the group, formed to study whether the state should put cable median barriers on K-10 between Lawrence and Lenexa, it will ask the Legislature to designate the stretch of K-10 as a highway safety corridor, a tactic that some states have been using for several years.

Members of a K-10 safety committee last week proposed a plan to increase fines and enforcement on the busy commuter highway east of Lawrence.

The committee of Douglas County and Johnson County officials and residents was formed at the urging of Gov. Sam Brownback in the wake of the April 16 cross-median crash near Eudora that killed two of the city’s residents, including 5-year-old Cainan Shutt.

Sen. Tom Holland, D-Baldwin City, said at last week’s meeting he intended to begin working on legislation and seek bipartisan support before proposing it in January. Supporters of designating K-10 as a safety corridor do have several examples from other states they can look to in deciding how far they want things to go.

Highway safety officials in other states urged Kansas to focus on getting input from the community and law enforcement agencies before setting up a highway safety corridor that could include more signs warning drivers, extra traffic patrols and increased fines.

“The advice would be to let the community lead it as long as data is their guiding light,” said Angie Ward, a program manager for the Washington Traffic Safety Commission, which has used safety corridors since the 1990s, although it’s not legal in the state to increase fines in the corridors.

State transportation officials in Washington, New Mexico and Virginia said highway safety corridors have helped reduce crashes along problematic stretches.

In New Mexico, department of transportation spokeswoman Megan Arredondo said the state saw 275 fewer crashes, or a 28 percent reduction, from 2001 to 2008 in its 12 safety corridors for areas that have a high number of injuries and deaths. Law enforcement has the authority to double fines on drivers who speed in the areas.

“In any safety corridor program, the key to success is high visibility enforcement,” Arredondo said.

New Mexico also installs signs that designate each corridor and posts lower speed limits.

In Virginia, the program has seen mixed results. Transportation officials said one major key is the ability for a state to direct funds for overtime to law enforcement to help with extra patrols.

Stephen Read, the highway safety improvement program manager for the Virginia Department of Transportation, said the state has seen a reduction in crashes in a more rural area on Interstate 81 compared to two other more urbanized stretches near the Washington, D.C., suburbs and Richmond area. He said in rural areas there’s less traffic and more room for law enforcement officers to target more dangerous drivers compared to heavily congested areas.

“I definitely think if you can keep that in the public eye, that you’ll see some effect,” Read said.

He said the corridor along I-81 has seen an 11 percent reduction in crashes when compared to similar locations. In the Richmond area it was about a 3 percent reduction, and the one in northern Virginia was about even.

But when he heard a description of K-10 between Lawrence and the suburban Kansas City area, Read said he thought it could be a good candidate to become a safety corridor.

In Washington, however, Ward, the traffic safety commission’s program manager, said her state likely wouldn’t designate K-10 and would probably look more to engineering solutions. But she said the key to using the corridors in her state center on increased enforcement and trying to generate an awareness, largely through the media, about safe driving habits.

“The biggest part in making this road safe,” Ward said, “is how you drive on it.”

By George Diepenbrock

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Weekend road work planned for metro highways

The Kansas Department of Transportation is reminding drivers that the summer road work season isn't over yet. Drivers are warned to expect delays due to the following weekend projects:

  • Interstate 35 will be reduced to one lane in both directions from 135th Street to 119th Street, beginning tonight at 10 p.m. and re-opening at 5:30 a.m. on Monday, Aug. 22.
  • United States Highway 69 will be reduced to one lane, both north and southbound, from Interstate 435 to College Boulevard, beginning tonight at 8 p.m. and re-opening at 5 a.m. on Monday, Aug. 22.
  • The ramp from westbound I-435 to southbound US-69 will be closed.
  • The ramp from eastbound I-435 to southbound US-69 will be closed.
  • The ramp from southbound US-69 to College Boulevard will be closed.

All projects are expected to be completed on Monday, Aug. 22.

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Alcohol believed to be a factor in Saturday morning K-10 fatality

The Kansas Highway Patrol has identified the fatality victim in a Saturday early morning K-10 accident as 23-year-old Ezequiel Gallardo-Moncalla of Kansas City.

Gallardo-Moncalla died after his Mazda 626, driving the wrong way in the westbound lanes on K-10 just west of Interstate 435, struck a Ford F150, driven by 28-year-old Olathe man Brian Ingalls.

According to Kansas Highway Patrol captain Dek Kruger, initial reports indicated Gallardo-Moncalla turned off of South Ridgeview Road onto the highway going the wrong direction and officers where unable to provide assistance before the crash occurred. Kruger said alcohol was believed to be a factor in the incident.

Ingalls was transported to Overland Park Regional Hospital. A hospital spokesperson said that Ingalls was in stable condition as of 1:15 p.m. Sunday, but could not release any other information.

By Shaun Hittle and Nick Nelson

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KDOT warns drivers to expect weekend delays

Drivers can expect multiple delays this weekend as several highways in the metro area undergo continued repair work, according to a traffic alert from the Kansas Department of Transportation.

Drivers should plan alternate routes or be prepared for lengthy delays. The following closures will take place, beginning at 7 p.m. tonight and reopening at 5:30 a.m. Monday:

  • Northbound Interstate 35 from 119th Street to 135th Street will have two closed lanes;
  • Southbound I-35 from 95th Street to College Boulevard will have two closed lanes;
  • All ramps from westbound Interstate 435 to I-35;
  • Northbound and southbound I-435 will be reduced to one lane.
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KDOT website to experience down time during maintenance

Drivers should expect to only see the base map on the Kansas Department of Transportation's 511.ksdot.org website today instead of the usual interactive information regarding road conditions and construction projects. Phone services are down as well.

The website and phones will be down until noon today for general maintenance, according to a press release sent out by the department. The KanDrive site will still be available.

More maintenance work is scheduled for Saturday, July 23, from 4:30 a.m.-6 p.m., which will also temporarily disable KDOT websites and phones.

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Johnson County commissioners propose project to install K-10 cable-median barriers

Members of the Johnson County Commission on Thursday proposed a pilot project to install cable-median barriers along Kansas Highway 10 in two spots between Lawrence east to Lenexa.

Commissioner Jim Allen, of Shawnee, said the proposal includes the state installing two miles of cable near K-10 and Kansas Highway 7 in Johnson County and for a one-mile stretch near Eudora, after two residents, including 5-year-old Cainan Shutt, were killed in an April 16 cross-median crash there.

“Our residents are concerned about this and want us to come up with some type of solution,” said Allen, who is also a member of an area group studying K-10’s safety with the Kansas Department of Transportation in the wake of the April crash.

The Johnson County proposal estimates the two-mile stretch of cable in Johnson County would cost $250,000 and $125,000 in Douglas County. Allen said Johnson County would seek to provide the state 20 percent of the funds for the Johnson County stretch.

Gov. Sam Brownback ordered KDOT officials to work with Johnson County and Douglas County residents and officials to study whether to install cable-median barriers on K-10, although KDOT would make the final decision. KDOT said in a 2008 study that K-10 did not meet a threshold to install cable-median barriers based on traffic counts and the highway’s median width.

Advocates for the cable say K-10 has become dangerous for the number of cross-median crashes at high speeds. In May, KDOT officials said K-10 had 11 fatalities resulting from 10 cross-median crashes since 2000, compared with 104 fatalities from 89 cross-median crashes on all Kansas four-lane highways.

Dean Sicking, a University of Nebraska civil engineering professor who conducted the 2008 study, said cable-median barriers are “not a panacea” and still can cause deaths and injuries. He urged the committee to study the two spots targeted for the pilot project proposal.

“It has to be based on reality and based on engineering principles,” said Sicking, who spoke to the study group Thursday, “so that we can be reasonably sure that when we do go out and spend money to make the highway safer, we do make it safer. That’s the ultimate goal.”

Allen said the two sections identified as part of the pilot study do warrant a cable-median barrier because more than one cross-median fatality accident have occurred in those two spots since 2000.

“We want to see something happen immediately, and to me at least to do something incrementally and address at least where we know we have a high-impact fatality area,” Allen said.

The study group will meet again next month.

By George Diepenbrock

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KDOT to host open house regarding I-435/US-69 interchange project

The Kansas Department of Transportation is hosting a public open house for the US Highway 69 and Interstate 435 Interchange Area Improvement Project from 4:30-6:30 p.m. today, July 7, at the DoubleTree Hotel located at 10100 College Boulevard, Overland Park.

Those who attend the open house can learn more about the construction phasing, traffic impacts, noise wall installation and watch a video simulation highlighting new traffic movements in the interchange area. KDOT staff and project members will be available to answer questions but no formal presentations will be made at this event.

Planned improvements on this project will add auxiliary lanes to I-435 between US-69 and Quivira Road. It will also continue improvements on US-69 from 103rd Street to 119th Street to address congestion at the I-435 and US-69 interchange. This phase of the US-69 and I-435 improvements in Johnson County is part of KDOT’s T-WORKS program and the selection of this improvement project was announced in February 2011.

Additional information about this project, construction schedules and traffic impacts will be available online after the public open house at http://www.ksdot.org/kcMetro.

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