Sheriff's department welcomes new deputies

Nine new deputies and one K-9 officer were honored today during a pinning ceremony by Johnson County Sheriff Frank Denning on Thursday, Jan. 4. Front row: Deputy Travis Turner and K-9 Nora. Middle Row, from left to right: Daniel Stach, Sabrina Sherman, Adam Livengood, Lauren Andreasen and Chad Jennings. Back Row, from left to right: Clinton Peterson, Tanner McGee, Skyler Johnson and Benjamin Giffin.

Nine new deputies and one K-9 officer were honored today during a pinning ceremony by Johnson County Sheriff Frank Denning on Thursday, Jan. 4. Front row: Deputy Travis Turner and K-9 Nora. Middle Row, from left to right: Daniel Stach, Sabrina Sherman, Adam Livengood, Lauren Andreasen and Chad Jennings. Back Row, from left to right: Clinton Peterson, Tanner McGee, Skyler Johnson and Benjamin Giffin.

After more than six months of training in the field and in the classroom, nine new deputies will officially be joining the Johnson County Sheriff's Department this afternoon.

Sheriff Frank Denning will be welcoming Lauren Andreasen, Benjamin Giffen, Chad Jennings, Skyler Johnson, Adam Livengood, Tanner McGee, Clinton Peterson, Sabrina Sherman and Daniel Stach with a badge pinning ceremony this afternoon at the Johnson County Administration building in Olathe.

Training to be a sheriff's deputy is broken down into four stages, according to department public information officer Master Deputy Tom Erickson.

Once hired the new personnel spends three weeks in pre-academy training learning the basics of "driving, fighting and shooting," according to Erickson. Next up are 16 weeks at the academy, followed by two weeks in the classroom learning procedure and paperwork and then a final six weeks of training at the jail. All new deputies are first assigned to detention.

The new deputies come on the heels of fifteen deputies who retired at the end of December.

The department will also be welcoming new K-9 officer Nora, a nearly three-year-old German Shepard, to the force. Nora spent five weeks training with her handler and is trained to detect marijuana, methamphetamine, cocaine and heroin. Like most police dogs, Nora was bred in Europe, in Amsterdam, where breeders are of higher quality, according to Erickson. She joins two other K-9 officers, Ace and Figo.

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