Archive for Thursday, September 15, 2005

Millers deliver for Gulf victims

September 15, 2005

For the Miller family of De Soto, donating to the survivors of Hurricane Katrina wasn't enough -- they wanted to visit.

Last weekend, Jeffrey and Alesa Miller took their two children on a mission to bring food, toys and goods to refugees in Mississippi. Alesa contacted members of the De Soto community through e-mail and was able to get $140 in donations and 4,600 pounds of supplies.

"My husband was born and raised in that area, so we've been there before," Alesa said. "It looked rough. The trees were down everywhere. There were roofs off homes. We didn't see anything too catastrophic, but met lots of people escaping from further down south."

Alesa said they arrived at Quitman, Miss., but the Assembly of God Church had so many donations they decided to go closer to hurricane-ravaged areas. They visited a church in Three Rivers, Miss., around 11 p.m. Saturday, where volunteers were waiting to unload the donations.

"It was just heart wrenching because they were working so hard, and we knew some of their lives weren't going to be back together for some time," she said.

Amy Miller,10, said her favorite part of the trip was helping a family in Arkansas on the way home. When the Millers stopped to rest in Little Rock, they met two families who had been offered refuge in a motel. The family had been trapped 45 miles north of New Orleans during the storm and couldn't get out because they couldn't buy gasoline. When the storm subsided, they had nowhere to go but north.

"We bought toys for the kids because they were staying in a motel," Amy said. "I thought it was hard for them. Our family couldn't do it."

Alesa Miller said both families had young children and had been offered a free two-week stay at the motel, free dinners at local restaurants and donations from the community.

"He said the biggest thing they needed were baby items," Alesa said. "We bought water so they could mix the baby formula."

Alesa said she was glad to see so many people willing to help survivors of the hurricane.

"It's heartwarming to realize this is America, and we live in a great country," she said. "It doesn't matter what bad is coming, there's plenty of people out there who are willing to help."

were waiting to unload the donations.

"It was just heart wrenching because they were working so hard, and we knew some of their lives weren't going to be back together for some time," she said.

Amy Miller, 10, said her favorite part of the trip was helping a family in Arkansas on the way home. When the Millers stopped to rest in Little Rock, they met two families who had been offered refuge in a motel. The family had been trapped 45 miles north of New Orleans during the storm and couldn't get out because they couldn't buy gasoline. When the storm subsided, they had nowhere to go but north.

"We bought toys for the kids because they were staying in a motel," Amy said. "I thought it was hard for them. Our family couldn't do it."

Alesa Miller said both families had young children and had been offered a free two-week stay at the motel, free dinners at local restaurants and donations from the community.

"He said the biggest thing they needed were baby items," Alesa said. "We bought water so they could mix the baby formula."

Alesa said she was glad to see so many people willing to help survivors of the hurricane.

"It's heartwarming to realize this is America, and we live in a great country," she said. "It doesn't matter what bad is coming, there's plenty of people out there who are willing to help."

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