Archive for Thursday, April 14, 2005

City nearing water plant agreement

De Soto USD 232, Sunflower Redevelopment also discussing transfer of Sunflower property

April 14, 2005

The city of De Soto and Sunflower Redevelopment LLC are working toward an agreement that would give the city title to the water treatment facility at the Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant.

De Soto City Administrator Greg Johnson said he met with Sunflower Redevelopment representatives late last month and again Tuesday.

The agreement will make formal the commitment Kessinger/Hunter and Co. principal Chuck Hunter made in a January letter to the city, written as the Johnson County Commission named the partnership of Kessinger/Hunter and International Risk Group Sunflower's developer of record.

In that letter, Hunter wrote the the city would get title to the water plant when the partnership received title to the closed ammunition plant. Sunflower Redevelopment officials are hoping the transfer from the federal government finalizes in June.

The agreement also allows De Soto to continue leasing the water towers, reservoirs and easements it currently uses at Sunflower.

Johnson said the city had been presented with terms of agreement for the water plant. The water plant and all other public benefit transfers will occur immediately after Sunflower was transferred to the developer. Attention has now focused on the terms of a lease agreement, he said.

Both parties envision the city will lease for the reservoirs and landmark Sunflower water towers a number of years before they are razed. The city's capital improvement plan calls for the eventual construction of a new water tower.

In addition to providing the city its water, the Sunflower treatment plant provides water to the Army and the civilian contractor at the plant at no charge. Its foElvyn J. Jones

ejones@newsmwc.com

The city of De Soto and Sunflower Redevelopment LLC are working toward an agreement that would give the city title to the water treatment facility at the Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant.

De Soto City Administrator Greg Johnson said he met with Sunflower Redevelopment representatives late last month and again Tuesday.

The agreement will make formal the commitment Kessinger/Hunter and Co. principal Chuck Hunter made in a January letter to the city, written as the Johnson County Commission named the partnership of Kessinger/Hunter and International Risk Group Sunflower's developer of record.

In that letter, Hunter wrote the the city would get title to the water plant when the partnership received title to the closed ammunition plant. Sunflower Redevelopment officials are hoping the transfer from the federal government finalizes in June.

The agreement also allows De Soto to continue leasing the water towers, reservoirs and easements it currently uses at Sunflower.

Johnson said the city had been presented with terms of agreement for the water plant. The water plant and all other public benefit transfers will occur immediately after Sunflower was transferred to the developer. Attention has now focused on the terms of a lease agreement, he said.

Both parties envision the city will lease for the reservoirs and landmark Sunflower water towers a number of years before they are razed. The city's capital improvement plan calls for the eventual construction of a new water tower.

In addition to providing the city its water, the Sunflower treatment plant provides water to the Army and the civilian contractor at the plant at no charge. Its former lease required the city to provide vast qualities of free water for cleanup efforts at the plant.

That won't continue with the water plant's transfer, Johnson said.

The city was aware that Sunflower Redevelopment would need water for the cleanup -- some of which could be untreated -- but any such arrangement couldn't put a burden on the city, Johnson said.

"They are mindful of, one, the financial impact situation and, two, the impaired operating system," he said.

Discussions on what those needs would be were now getting started, as Sunflower Redevelopment engineers begin meetings with city engineer Mike Brungardt.

There has been no discussions of Sunflower's long-term water needs, Johnson said.

For its part, the city has hired Shafer, Kline and Warren to do a review of the water plant and how it could fit into a regional market.

De Soto USD 232 is also involved in talks with Sunflower Redevelopment. The U.S. Department of Education has approved the school district's public benefit request of acres for future school campuses.

The problem for the school district is that it won't know exactly what land it wants until it has a residential development plan for the property, district planner Jack Deyoe said.




Elvyn J. Jones

ejones@newsmwc.com

The city of De Soto and Sunflower Redevelopment LLC are working toward an agreement that would give the city title to the water treatment facility at the Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant.

De Soto City Administrator Greg Johnson said he met with Sunflower Redevelopment representatives late last month and again Tuesday.

The agreement will make formal the commitment Kessinger/Hunter and Co. principal Chuck Hunter made in a January letter to the city, written as the Johnson County Commission named the partnership of Kessinger/Hunter and International Risk Group Sunflower's developer of record.

In that letter, Hunter wrote the the city would get title to the water plant when the partnership received title to the closed ammunition plant. Sunflower Redevelopment officials are hoping the transfer from the federal government finalizes in June.

The agreement also allows De Soto to continue leasing the water towers, reservoirs and easements it currently uses at Sunflower.

Johnson said the city had been presented with terms of agreement for the water plant. The water plant and all other public benefit transfers will occur immediately after Sunflower was transferred to the developer. Attention has now focused on the terms of a lease agreement, he said.

Both parties envision the city will lease for the reservoirs and landmark Sunflower water towers a number of years before they are razed. The city's capital improvement plan calls for the eventual construction of a new water tower.

In addition to providing the city its water, the Sunflower treatment plant provides water to the Army and the civilian contractor at the plant at no charge. Its former lease required the city to provide vast qualities of free water for cleanup efforts at the plant.

That won't continue with the water plant's transfer, Johnson said.

The city was aware that Sunflower Redevelopment would need water for the cleanup -- some of which could be untreated -- but any such arrangement couldn't put a burden on the city, Johnson said.

"They are mindful of, one, the financial impact situation and, two, the impaired operating system," he said.

Discussions on what those needs would be were now getting started, as Sunflower Redevelopment engineers begin meetings with city engineer Mike Brungardt.

There has been no discussions of Sunflower's long-term water needs, Johnson said.

For its part, the city has hired Shafer, Kline and Warren to do a review of the water plant and how it could fit into a regional market.

De Soto USD 232 is also involved in talks with Sunflower Redevelopment. The U.S. Department of Education has approved the school district's public benefit request of acres for future school campuses.

The problem for the school district is that it won't know exactly what land it wants until it has a residential development plan for the property, district planner Jack Deyoe said.

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