Archive for Wednesday, December 24, 2003

Comprehensive Plan update sent back to Planning Commission

December 24, 2003

Differences in how questions about future land uses in the Kill Creek Road corridor should be addressed led the De Soto City Council to reject an update to the comprehensive plan.

The 4-2 vote to send the update back to the Planning Commission became official when Mayor Dave Anderson somewhat reluctantly joined the majority.

Differences in how questions about future land uses in the Kill Creek Road corridor should be addressed led the De Soto City Council to reject an update to the comprehensive plan. The 4-2 vote to send the update back to the Planning Commission became official when Mayor Dave Anderson somewhat reluctantly joined the majority. "I'll vote yes because I won't have a tie," he said. The Council could rewrite the offending sections on its own during a second review of the update, but that would take a supermajority vote. Although Councilman Emil Urbanek submitted a 10-page report suggesting text changes to the document, the subject of the Council's concern was the future land-use map for the property between Kill Creek and Waverly roads north of Kansas Highway 10. Although that area of De Soto east of Kill Creek Road was given more restrictive residential land uses in the update, property in the Kill Creek Road corridor was shown with its existing low- to moderate-density residential land uses of one to four homes per acre. The Planning Commission also wrestled with the question, Planning Commission Roger Templin told the Council. Unable to come to a solution, it included the corridor in a transitional overlay district that included all of De Soto east of Kill Creek Road and the 95th Street corridor west of Lexington Avenue.

"I'll vote yes because I won't have a tie," he said.

The Council could rewrite the offending sections on its own during a second review of the update, but that would take a supermajority vote.

Although Councilman Emil Urbanek submitted a 10-page report suggesting text changes to the document, the subject of the Council's concern was the future land-use map for the property between Kill Creek and Waverly roads north of Kansas Highway 10. Although that area of De Soto east of Kill Creek Road was given more restrictive residential land uses in the update, property in the Kill Creek Road corridor was shown with its existing low- to moderate-density residential land uses of one to four homes per acre.

The Planning Commission also wrestled with the question, Planning Commission Roger Templin told the Council. Unable to come to a solution, it included the corridor in a transitional overlay district that included all of De Soto east of Kill Creek Road and the 95th Street corridor west of Lexington Avenue.

The area within the overlay district would be subject to further study, Templin said, during which results of a planned city sewer study would be considered. As part of that effort, the Council had already agreed to appoint a citizen's committee to make recommendations for the area's future land use.

The Council's choice, Templin said, was to approve the update with overlay district or send the update back to the Planning Commission.

Councilwomen Mitra Templin and Linda Zindler expressed their willingness to accept the an overlay district and work toward a solution to the land-use question.

By contrast, Urbanek said he didn't have faith in the overlay district.

"I don't really believe this would get changed," he said of the land use.

Councilman Tim Maniez said maps in the plan indicating possible future service areas for the city's water and sewer systems seemed to commit to developing those areas. Specifically, he objected to the indication of sewer expansion along Kill Creek and the extension of water north of the Kansas River.

The maps weren't meant as declarations of extension but rather they only indicated areas that could be served, City Engineer Mike Brungardt said. The sewer map, he said, was basically a sewer-basin map.

As it became clear the update did not have enough support, Templin reminded the Council the current comprehensive plan and its land uses would be in place until an update was approved. That could take between six months and a year, he said.

In casting the deciding vote, Anderson made a request of the Council members who found fault with the update.

"I would ask those opposed to be active at Planning Commission discussions," he said.

The delay will cost the city $1,700 in grant money from the state to rewrite the plan, Brungardt said.

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